Who We Are
Victor Dzau

Victor Dzau

NAM
President, National Academy of Medicine

Bio

Dr. Victor Dzau is President of the National Academy of Medicine, vice chair of the National Research Council, chancellor emeritus of Duke University, and past CEO of Duke Health System. Previously, Dr. Dzau was the Hersey Professor and Chairman of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, as well as Chairman of Medicine at Stanford University. He is one of the most influential leaders in health and is recognized globally for a highly decorated career as a physician scientist, administrator, and leader.

His groundbreaking work in cardiovascular medicine and genetics laid the foundation for the development of ACE inhibitors — lifesaving drugs used globally to treat hypertension and heart failure. He pioneered gene therapy for vascular disease and was the first to introduce DNA decoy molecules in humans in vivo. In leading research on cardiovascular regeneration, Dr. Dzau developed the Paracrine Hypothesis of stem-cell action and the strategy of direct cardiac reprogramming.

As a visionary healthcare leader, Dzau has set an inspiring example, developing initiatives to transform and improve healthcare locally and globally. He believes that health and science leaders should be engaged in developing solutions to broad-reaching social challenges that affect us all. At NAM, he leads a strategy of innovation and equity. Under his tenure, the NAM has advanced important initiatives such as the Grand Challenge in Climate Change and Human Health, the International Human Gene Editing Initiative, and the Committee on Emerging Science, Technology, and Innovation in Health and Medicine. As a leader in academic medicine, he has recently advanced the model of “Bench to Bedside to Population to Society” to include population health, social mission, and equity in the academic mission.

A leader in global health, Dzau launched the Duke Global Health Institute and Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore, founded the Division of Global Health Equity at Harvard, and chairs the International Advisory Board of McGill’s School of Population and Global Health. Among other activities, he serves on WHO and World Bank’s Global Preparedness Monitoring Board, was co-chair of the G20 Scientific Panel on Global Health Security, and was on the board of the Coalition of Epidemic Preparedness and Innovation. He leads the World Economic Forum Regional Vaccine Manufacturing Collaborative and is co-chair of the Science and Technology Expert Panel for the Independent Pandemic Preparedness Secretariat.

Among his honors are the Max Delbrück Medal, the American Heart Association’s Distinguished Scientist Award, the Ellis Island Medal of Honor, the Polzer Prize from the European Academy of Sciences and Arts, and the Henry Freisen International Prize. In 2014, he received the Public Service Medal from the president of Singapore. He has received 20 honorary doctorates.